}

Melting Ice Experiment

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Dancing Queen wanted to do her Science Fair project on melting ice. She was curious about what would make ice melt faster. This was a simple science experiment to do with items we already had in our kitchen.

This melting ice science experiment is perfect for science fairs.

Materials needed for this simple science experiment:

Before beginning the experiment, have students talk about what they expect the results to be. Ask them what variable will melt the ice fastest.

Fill 6 small Dixie cups with water. Freeze overnight. Cut the frozen water out of the cups (adult help may be required for this step). Place one in each of the compartments in the muffin tin. Pour hot water on one, cold water on another, steam on another, salt on another, and sugar on another. Leave one alone so that it can act as the control. Adult supervision is important, particularly with the steam and hot water.

Students can document the progress through taking pictures or journalling observations at one minute, five minutes, half an hour, and one hour after adding the variables.

Here is a picture before we added anything to the ice:

IMG_1265

IMG_1267This is immediately after adding the variables to the ice:

ice experiment 1This is after five minutes:

ice experiment 2This is after half an hour:

ice experiment 3This is after one hour:

ice experiment 4As you can see, the control did melt slower than any of the others. Hot water melted the fastest.

Dancing Queen then dictated to me what she had observed during the experiment and we included that as well as a picture she drew of the process and the photographs on her display board for the Science Fair.

melting ice



This is a great hands-on science experiment to explain how fold mountains are formed.How Fold Mountains are Madejello colour mixing experiment10 Jello Science Experiments

Super Science Activities

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These are fun science activities that can be done with kids and many of them use items you probably already have around the house!Super Science Activities to do with kids with inexpensive items

Kitchen Science Activities

Jello Science Experiments from here on The Chaos and The Clutter (pictured)

Fireworks in Oil and Water from Go Science Girls

Edible Science Experiments for Kids {Printables} The Natural Homeschool

Naked Egg Cell Study from STEAM Powered Family

Testing for Air from Happy Brown House

Onion DNA Experiment from Teach Beside Me (pictured)

Sink or Float Experiment with Lemons from One Perfect Day

Make Your Own Plastic Toys with Milk from STEAM Powered Family

Lima Bean Dissection from Mama Papa Bubba

How to Make Frost from Schooling a Monkey (pictured)

Dancing Rice from Buggy and Buddy

Colourful Celery from here on The Chaos and The Clutter

Apple Science from Coffee Cups and Crayons

super-science-activities-squ

Solar System Science Activities

Solar System I-Spy Bag from Research Parent (pictured)

Our Space Explorer Adventure from The Natural Homeschool

Phases of the Moon from The Pinay Homeschooler

Space Sensory Bottle from here on The Chaos and The Clutter (pictured)

Solar System Unit from here on The Chaos and The Clutter

Space Adventures, Games & Activities for Kids {Printable Sets} from The Natural Homeschool

Candy Science Activities

Colourful Candy Science Experiments from STEAM Powered Family (pictured)

Skittles Density Experiment from Winegums & Watermelons

Dissolving Gobstoppers from Mama Papa Bubba

Gummy Bear Osmosis Science from Raising Lifelong Learners

Science with Candy from Mama Miss

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Outdoor Science Activities

Backyard Science Lab from Racheous

Nature Ideas for Kids: Herb Garden Play from The Natural Homeschool

Frozen Bubbles from P is for Preschooler

Making a Solar Still from Teach Beside Me

Make a Windsock from here on The Chaos and The Clutter

Nature Ideas for Kids from The Natural Homeschool

Earth Science Activities

How Fold Mountains are Made from here on The Chaos and The Clutter (pictured)

Earthquake Science Experiment from here on The Chaos and The Clutter

Erosion vs. Weathering from The Natural Homeschool (pictured)

How do Salt Flats Form from Planet Smarty Pants

Layers of the Earth from here on The Chaos and The Clutter (pictured)

Graham Cracker Plate Tectonics from Playdough to Plato (pictured)

Making Groundwater from here on The Chaos and The Clutter

Wave in a Bottle from Sugar, Spice and Glitter

Gravity Defying Beads from here on The Chaos and The Clutter

Tide Pool Science Experiment from Buggy and Buddy (pictured)

Solar System Unit

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There are so many inventive hands-on ideas out there to use when creating a solar system unit. It was almost as much planning this homeschool unit study as it was to teach it!

Solar System Unit Study ideas including hands-on learning and printablesI used a variety of teaching materials for this unit including the CKE Earth and Space curriculum and the online course Experiencing Astronomy.Experience AstronomyWe also borrowed several books from the library and also used a few that we own. Here are some that we used for this unit:

The New Astronomy Guide: Stargazing in a Digital Age

The Night Sky Pocket Guide

The Magic School Bus Lost in the Solar System

Space and the Solar System: God’s Amazing Creation

National Geographic Planets

Moonwalk: The First Walk on the Moon

Phases of the Moon

I try to incorporate sensory elements into all of our unit studies. For our solar system unit, I created a glow-in-the-dark solar system sensory bin and a weighted Space sensory bottle.

Space Sensory Bottle

Using a free printable that I found on 123Homeschool4Me, we brought a case of Oreo cookies to our homeschool coop and made the phases of the moon out of Oreos. The kids enjoyed this activity so much that they also did it at home a few days later. They said it was so that they could study the moon phases but I suspect it may have had more to do with the Oreos than the learning!

phases of the moon with Oreo cookiesThe kids completed phases of the moon flip books. We found the printables for those on Teachers Pay Teachers (free). I especially liked that they came in two types, one for older kids and one for younger kids. This worked really well for me with the various ages of my kids.

I used an mnemonic that I learned when I was a girl to help them memorize the order of the planets from the Sun. I know that there is controversy about whether or not Pluto is really a planet, but I had done some research and it seems that it is still considered a planet (sometimes called a dwarf planet) by those at NASA, so I told this to the kids but I included it in my mnemonic (you can click on that link or the photo below if you would like to print it off for yourself).

My Very Eyes May Just See U Now Pluto

Mercury Venus Earth Mars Jupiter Saturn Uranus Neptune Pluto

Mnemonic for learning the order of the planetsMy kids were the most interested by what they learned in Experiencing Astronomy. It’s an online course that Einstein has been taking this year and learning so much but during the course of our solar system unit, I had all of the kids listen to the Experiencing Astronomy videos. They were intrigued and it led to many interesting discussions and learning.

At the beginning of our unit study on the Solar System, I took the kids to the Space and Science Center in the city closest to us and when we finished the unit, my mom took them there again. There is a large area there devoted to the solar system with many hands-on learning opportunities. It was a great way to reinforce their learning.

Solar System Unit Study sq.We decided to segment our solar system unit study and do a specific study on Earth. In the course of that study, these are some of the science experiments that we did:

Layers of the Earth

How Fold Mountains are Made

Making Groundwater

Earthquake Experiment

Learning About the Earth Science Experiments

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I have to say that I have found it much more interesting to teach science as a homeschooler than I did to learn science as a student. I want my kids to love learning and so in my quest to make science engaging, I look for hands-on activities that will help my kids to retain what they learn. When we were learning about the Earth, we found some awesome science experiments!

Doing these hands-on activities made learning about the Earth interesting and helped the kids to understand the concepts much better than if all of our unit had been reading out of a textbook.  Their favourite ones seemed to be the ones about natural disasters such as earthquakes, tornados and hurricanes. Personally, I found the groundwater one to be the most interesting as it was something I didn’t know before.

These science experiments make learning about the Earth interesting and fun.Layers of the Earth from here on The Chaos and The Clutter (pictured)

How to Make a Volcano with Kids from Happy Brown House (pictured)

Making Groundwater from here on The Chaos and The Clutter

Why is the Sky Blue? from Rookie Parenting (pictured)

How Fold Mountains are Made from here on The Chaos and The Clutter

This is a great hands-on science experiment to explain how fold mountains are formed.Graham Cracker Plate Tectonics from Playdough to Plato (pictured)

Landform Activities from Gift of Curiosity

Earthquake Experiment from here on The Chaos and The Clutter

Tornado made with Soda Bottles

Make a Hurricane from Inspiration Laboratories (pictured)

Hurricane in a Jar from One Time Through (pictured)

Water Cycle in a Bag from Playdough to Plato (pictured)

Make a Rock from Fantastic Fun and Learning (pictured)

These science experiments make learning about the Earth interesting and fun.If you are looking for more fun science ideas, be sure to check out my Simple Science board on Pinterest where you will find tons of hands-on experiments and learning activities.

Follow Sharla Kostelyk’s board Simple Science on Pinterest.